Welcome to!

This is the personal homepage of Noah Petherbridge, and it's where I keep my web blog and various creative projects.

I blog about anything I find interesting, and since I have a lot of varied interests, my blog entries are kind of all over the place. You can browse my tags to sort them by topic and see which ones I frequently write about, or the archive has a complete history of my posts, dating back to 2008!

Besides my blog, I have pages for my creative projects, which are linked to on the navigation bar.

I write a lot about Linux and Android, Minecraft, and I like to rant about stuff. Generally anything that makes me curious.

For the geeks: this website respects your privacy and doesn't run any third party ads or analytics. This site speaks HTTP and doesn't require any JavaScript to work.

script.go: Run Go Programs as Shell Scripts
January 7, 2018 by Noah

Have you ever wanted to use Go to write shell scripts?

Where you could put a "shebang" line like #!/usr/bin/env go, mark your source file executable, and run it?

I've found a pretty elegant way of making this possible, all in pure Go!


To write your own Go scripts, just include this shebang header (vim modeline optional). Your shell script does not need a *.go extension. In fact you're better off not having a *.go extension!

///bin/true && exec /usr/bin/env script.go "$0" "$@"
// vim:set ft=go:

And then put this file, script.go, in your $PATH and make it executable:


Tags: 0 comments | Permalink in Go
December 24, 2017 by Noah

As of a few minutes ago, I've swapped out the Python backend of with a new Go backend that I've been rewriting from scratch the past few months.

The Go codebase is a little rough around the edges and I'll be refactoring it over time. This is the first blog post on the new platform, so let me tell you about my open source Go blog!


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Apps composed of open source pieces
September 15, 2017 by Noah

The Internet is full of freely available source code. If you're a software engineer and you're writing a new application, chances are a lot of the code you're writing has already been written thousands of times before by other engineers that came before you.

Some engineers seem to believe you can compose an entire complicated app just by mixing and matching tiny pieces already written before you. Pull a session manager from here, a template engine from there... a login manager, a password manager, a database accessor... all of these being small off-the-shelf components that you're trying to duct tape together into one coherent app. The actual code you as a developer write is just the few lines needed to stitch these all together. You'll have a production-ready app running in just a few minutes!

Sure, but in my career as a software engineer I've learned that it's usually better to write all those pieces yourself so that they fit together perfectly how you want, not just "good enough."

This is a story of a particularly annoying Python module I was dealing with at work.


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Do you need to store that IP address?
August 16, 2017 by Noah

I was reading this ACLU blog post about how DreamHost was served with a warrant to hand over IP addresses of some 1.3 million visitors to a website they host, and it got me thinking: do websites really need to store IP addresses of their visitors?

There are a lot of VPN companies such as Private Internet Access that advertise far and wide that they explicitly chose not to keep any logs. The idea is that if the VPN provider is served with a warrant for user activity, they would have no data to hand over, because they never stored anything in the first place. Why don't websites do that?


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Go Plugins and Avoiding Cyclic Dependencies
July 20, 2017 by Noah

The other day, I started a project to eventually replace the backend of with a Go program instead of the current Python one (Rophako). It will support a similar feature set (being modular with even the core functionality, like user accounts and web blogs, being served by built-in "plugins" and allowing users to extend it with their own plugins).

The plugin system will support both compile-time plugins (your main.go imports and registers all the plugins you need when compiling the binary), and run-time plugins using Go's plugins from *.so files support.

This post will focus on the former, compile-time plugins, and how I ran into a cyclic dependency issue and worked around it.


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