Category: Curiosity

Google knows when you wake up?

Noah Petherbridge
kirsle
Posted by Noah Petherbridge on Saturday, September 26 2015 @ 04:25:11 AM

Something pretty odd that's happened to me on more than a couple of occasions:

I'll wake up in the morning, and then a couple minutes later people start sending me messages on Google Hangouts, so my phone's making a bunch of noise. If it's early enough in the morning, some of those messages will even say things like, "you're up early."

The thing is though, I didn't even touch my phone yet. I didn't even look at my phone.

Messages like this don't tend to wake me up, but instead I don't start getting messages until just after I'm awake.

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Internet Protocol version 6

Noah Petherbridge
kirsle
Posted by Noah Petherbridge on Monday, July 20 2015 @ 01:53:26 PM

Last weekend I was pleasantly surprised to discover that Time Warner Cable already supports IPv6 at my apartment.

They shipped me a newer cable modem/WiFi router combo device earlier this year as part of their plan to upgrade everyone's Internet speeds in Los Angeles. I didn't realize that this modem also supported IPv6, and it wasn't enabled by default.

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Linux Desktop Remote Code Execution via File URI

Noah Petherbridge
kirsle
Posted by Noah Petherbridge on Friday, March 27 2015 @ 02:04:08 PM
I've discovered a sort of "remote code execution" vulnerability that affects all Linux desktops, particularly Fedora and Ubuntu but most likely all desktop Linux distributions could be affected, except for maybe Arch or Gentoo with extremely customized installations.

First and foremost: this requires the victim to click not one, but two random links sent to them over Pidgin (or any other program that does URL auto-linking the way Pidgin does). So it's not exactly the most severe vulnerability, but I found it interesting nonetheless.

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Skype switched to the MSN Messenger Protocol

Noah Petherbridge
kirsle
Posted by Noah Petherbridge on Tuesday, December 09 2014 @ 10:21:54 AM

Today, Fedora 21 was released and I upgraded to it immediately, and decided not to install Skype this time.

Skype for Linux has been poorly maintained, going years between updates sometimes, and who knows what kind of unknown zero-day vulnerabilities are in there. On my previous installation of Fedora, Skype twice showed a weird issue where it replaced some of its icons with Chinese (or Korean, or something) symbols. I posted about it on Reddit and the Skype forum with no responses, as if I'm the only one who's ever seen this. Was I hacked? Maybe.

I took the latest Windows version of Skype and dumped all its icons trying to find these weird symbols but came up empty-handed. And I don't know of any way to pry icons out of the Linux binary of Skype. So... for now I just don't trust it.


In other news, I decided to Google the Skype protocol, and see what the progress is on people attempting to reverse engineer it, to be able to build an open source third-party Skype client (e.g. to have support in Pidgin). The Wikipedia article said something interesting:

On June 20, 2014, Microsoft announced the deprecation of the old Skype protocol. [...] The new Skype protocol - Microsoft Notification Protocol 24 - promises better offline messaging and better messages synchronization across Skype devices.

I wrote previously that the MSN Messenger service was still alive but it looks like it's the future of Skype as well.

The Microsoft Notification Protocol (MSNP) is the protocol used by MSN Messenger/Windows Live Messenger. I'm reasonably familiar with it from back in the day when I used to work on chatbots that signed in to MSN Messenger to accept their add requests and carry on conversations with humans.

MSNP is a plain text, line-delimited protocol similar to SMTP. There is some outdated documentation up through MSNP10 that we referenced in developing an MSN module in Perl. As an example, this is what you'd see going over the network if somebody sent a chat message to a friend:

MSG 4 N 133
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8
X-MMS-IM-Format: FN=Arial; EF=I; CO=0; CS=0; PF=22

Hello! How are you?

The protocol consisted of command lines, typically three letters long (some I remember offhand: NLN--go online, FLN--go offline, BRB--set status to "be right back", RNG--request a conversation with a contact ("ring"), ANS--accept a conversation request ("answer"), and MSG--send a message). The RNG and ANS commands were invisible to the user in the official client, but allowed for some interesting behaviors in our chatbots (like immediately sending you a message the moment you open their chat window, before you even begin to type anything!)

It's interesting that Skype "downgraded" to the MSNP though, given that Skype's old protocol was an impenetrable fortress of obfuscation and encryption that nobody's ever managed to reverse engineer. Even third party clients like Trillian that had Skype support were technically using SkypeKit, a developer tool that allowed Skype to be remote controlled, but which kept all the proprietary bits a secret still. On the other hand, it makes sense for them to make Skype conform to Outlook.com and their other services that used MSNP, rather than upgrade all their other services to use the Skype protocol.

The last version of Windows Live Messenger used MSNP19 (or MSNP21 depending who you ask), so the new Skype protocol is just the next version of MSNP.

In Googling MSNP24 I found this site where efforts are already underway at reverse engineering it. This other site has a lot more details on the current status of the Messenger protocol.

It's only a matter of time now until Pidgin can natively support Skype accounts. It will also be fun to program chatbots for Skype. :)

Minecraft Clones

Noah Petherbridge
kirsle
Posted by Noah Petherbridge on Wednesday, October 22 2014 @ 11:10:28 AM

These are just some of my thoughts on things that a Minecraft clone should probably do differently to Mojang's (well, Microsoft's) Minecraft, since a clone would be starting from scratch anyway and would be in a good position to fix some of the fundamental problems in the original game that are impossible/unlikely to be fixed by Microsoft.

Some of the Minecraft clones I'm familiar with so far are Terasology, Minetest, and Michael Fogleman's Craft. So far, Craft seems to do the most things "right" (as far as my list of fundamental improvements on Minecraft go) such as only storing changes to the blocks to disk rather than whole entire chunks, but more on that in a minute.

Disclaimer: I'm not a game developer. I am a software developer and have a particular interest in the technology used in games, i.e. I have the knowledge to write code for most given game mechanics and spend countless hours thinking about these sorts of things. I've read a lot about the technical internals of Minecraft and have read some of the source code to these clones, so this blog post is full of my own educated opinions on things. I may, at some point, take on the challenge of creating a Minecraft clone of my own, but until then these are just the things I've been thinking about over the last several months.

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